American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix


The American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix, is a mixed breed dog resulting from breeding the American Hairless Terrier and the Beagle. Both of these dogs can be friendly but personalities differ, so you never know. The American Hairless Terrier is known for being lively, inquisitive, and intelligent. All dogs need proper socialization and that will be a big factor in how they interact with others. What does this mixed breed look and act like? Is it more like the American Hairless Terrier or the Beagle? Those are the questions we will try and answer below. Continue reading below to see pictures, videos, and learn more about the beautiful American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix.

While we really recommend that you acquire all animals through a rescue, we understand that some people might go through a breeder to get their American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix puppy. That is, if they have any American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix puppies for sale.

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American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix History

All hybrid or designer dogs are tough to get a good read on as there isn’t much history to them. Breeding specific dogs like this has become common in the last twenty years or so even though I am sure that this mixed breed found it’s share of dogs to the shelter due to accidental breeding. We will take a closer look at the history of both parent breeds below. If you are looking at breeders for new, designer dogs please beware of Puppy Mills. These are places that mass produce puppies, specifically for profit and don’t care at all about the dogs. If you have a few minutes, please sign our petition to stop puppy mills.

American Hairless Terrier History

The American Hairless Terrier started in 1972 from one hairless female puppy in a litter of Rat Terriers. This one lone dog, named Josephine had pink skin with large black spots. She was actually given away out of the litter. Being that she was hairless and didn’t shed, the Scotts (who now had adopted the puppy), went on to breed her. Her offspring was originally registered as a hairless variety of Rat Terrier. Many American Hairless Terriers are still born with a coat, recognised as a coated variety. This breed went on to be recognized by the United Kennel Club in 2004 and the American Kennel Club in 2016. The breed still continues to this day and comes in two sizes, miniature and standard. All of this breeding was done with careful outcroppings with the Rat Terrier. If you are wondering about the Rat Terrier, they were originally bred to hunt Rats and other vermin. People would actually place wagers on them and use them as a way to place bets. However, the original breeding was done for practical purposes - to keep rats out of barns.



Beagle History

Perhaps the world’s best-known beagle is Charles Schulz’s Snoopy, star of the Peanuts comic strip. Although Schulz modeled his creation on his own childhood dog, the cerebral and aloof Snoopy should not be considered an example of the breed!

Real Beagles are happy little family dogs who love attention. They are active, playful and energetic, particularly in puppyhood and adolescence. Professionally, the Beagle is a proficient scent hound who tracks and traps small game, typically working in a pack. Non-hunting family Beagles also behave as part of a pack, even if the pack is just you and your Beagle.

Experts caution against having baby Beagles and baby humans in your home at the same time, given that the demands of caring for puppies and human infants and toddlers simultaneously will drive most adult humans to their beds. Instead, allow your older children (5+) to experience the fun of raising a puppy and helping with the work. As with all dogs, consider adopting a middle-aged or senior Beagle to avoid or minimize training requirements.

Beagle history is someone murky. A nameless Greek hunting dog from the 5th century is considered the Beagle’s likeliest and oldest ancestor. Later on in the 8th century, the St. Hubert Hound begat the Talbot Hound, which eventually led to the birth of the beagle.

Believe it or not, the first dogs to be called beagles stood just 8 to 9 inches in height and were commonly called “Pocket Beagles.” Elizabeth I of England kept several Pocket Beagles, using them to entertain guests at court. It’s not clear why hunters and breeders wanted to create such a small dog, and by the mid-18th century the Beagle had grown in height and length to more closely resemble the dog we know today. Sadly, the “Pocket Beagle” became extinct in 1901.

The 1840s and the surge in the popularity of fox hunting led to the development of four distinct dogs known as Beagles, some of which had little in common with the others. By the 1870s, the breed was dying out again until a dedicated group of Beagle aficionados set about saving them. By 1902 there were 44 known packs in England, a number that would grow in the new century.

Beagles were introduced to the U.S. in the 1870s and a quality bloodline was established. Their popularity grew quickly. Beagles are the first breed to appear on “America’s Top 10 Most Popular Dog Breed List” every year since their AKC acceptance. They have been frequent winners in AKC competitions since the late 1920s, and in 2008, a Beagle took “Best in Show” at Westminster for the very first time!

Small game hunting is not the only job that suits a Beagle. These days law enforcement uses him as a detection dog, as his scenting ability helps him quickly locate prohibited agricultural items as well as illegal drugs. The U.S. Department of Agriculture calls their team the Beagle Brigade.


American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix Size and Weight

American Hairless Terrier
Height: 12 - 16 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 10 - 16 lb.
Lifespan: 14 - 16years

Beagle
Height: 13 - 15 inches at the shoulder
Weight: 18 - 35 lb.
Lifespan: 12 - 15 years


American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix Personality

The American Hairless Terrier and the Beagle might be a little bit spunky. They can be an inquisitive little fella so keep on the lookout for that behavior! All dogs need attention and don't want to be left alone. That's why you have a pet, right? Plan on putting forth effort to socialize her as this will reap dividends in the long run. Please use always use positive reinforcement even though they can have a mind of their own. Enjoy being with your new mixed breed and love the relationship you will have with them.


American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix Health

All dogs have the potential to develop genetic health problems as all breeds are susceptible to some things more than others. However, the one positive thing about getting a puppy is that you can avoid this as much as possible. A breeder should absolutely offer a health guarantee on puppies. If they won’t do this, then look no more and don’t consider that breeder at all. A reputable breeder will be honest and open about health problems in the breed and the incidence with which they occur. We obviously recommend that you look for a reputable animal rescue in your area to find your new mixed breed. Health clearances prove that a dog has been tested for and cleared of a particular condition.

The American Hairless Terrier mixed with the Beagle might be prone to joint dysplasia, patellar luxation, allergies, epilepsy, dental, deafness, liver shunt, among others.

Note that these are just common problems in both breeds.


American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix Care


What are the grooming requirements?

Even if you know the breed, sometimes it is hard to tell if it will be a heavy shedder or a light shedder. Either way, Get ready to invest in a good vacuum if you want to keep your floors clean! Give them baths as needed, but not so much that you dry out their skin.

What are the exercise requirements?

Plan on taking them for extremely long walks and hikes to keep their energy level down. This mix will more than likely have a high energy level. This exercise will keep them from being destructive. A tired dog is a good dog. A tired dog is a good dog though. Never tie your dog up outside - that is inhumane and not fair to him.

What are the training requirements?

This is an intelligent dog that will be a little bit challenging to train. They are going to want to take the alpha position and need someone with a firm, strong, hand that can let them know their place. The best thing you can do is break the sessions into shorter daily sessions to keep their attention span higher. It might have a prey drive and be disposed to running for and chasing small prey, but if handled properly this can be managed. All dogs respond best to positive reinforcement. So make sure to praise her when she does well. She is an intelligent dog who loves to please, and loves a physical challenge. The more exercise she gets the easier she will be to train. Proper socialization is imperative to all dogs and puppies. Make sure to take her to the park and doggy day care to get her around as many people and dogs as possible.


American Hairless Terrier Beagle Mix Feeding

"A lot of times diet is done on a per-dog basis. Each one is unique and has different dietary requirements. Most dogs in the U.S. are overweight. A mix like this one that is prone to hip and elbow dysplasia should really be on fish oil and glucosamine and chondroitin supplements as soon as possible. A good diet to look into is Raw Food Diet. A raw food diet will be especially good for the Wolf background.

Overfeeding any dog is not a good idea as that can really exacerbate health problems such as elbow and hip dysplasia.

I good diet to look into is Raw Food Diet. A raw food diet will be especially good for the Wolf background."



American Hairless Terrier Links

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